Drug information of Ceritinib

Ceritinib

Drug group:

Antineoplastic Agent, Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Inhibitor

Pharmacodynamic

Ceritinib is a potent inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a tyrosine kinase involved in the pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer. ALK gene abnormalities due to mutations or translocations may result in expression of oncogenic fusion proteins (eg, ALK fusion protein) which alter signaling and expression and result in increased cellular proliferation and survival in tumors which express these fusion proteins. ALK inhibition reduces proliferation of cells expressing the genetic alteration. Ceritinib also inhibits insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), insulin receptor (InsR), and ROS1. Ceritinib has demonstrated activity in crizotinib-resistant tumors in NSCLC xenograft models.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption

AUC and Cmax increased 73% and 41%, respectively, when a single ceritinib 500 mg was administered with a high-fat meal, and 58% and 43%, respectively when taken with a low-fat meal (when compared to fasting). A dose optimization study (comparing ceritinib 450 mg or 600 mg daily with food to ceritinib 750 mg [fasted]) found no clinically meaningful difference in the systemic steady-state exposure of ceritinib 450 mg (with food) compared to the 750 mg fasted arm (Cho 2017).

Distribution

4,230 L (following a single 750 mg fasted dose), with a small preferential distribution to red blood cells versus plasma

Metabolism

Primarily hepatic via CYP3A

Excretion

Feces (~92% with 68% as unchanged drug); urine (~1%)

Time to Peak

~4 to 6 hours

Half-Life Elimination

41 hours (following a single 750 mg fasted dose)

Protein Binding

97% to human plasma proteins 

Drug indications

Antineoplastic Agent, Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Inhibitor

Dosage

Non-small cell lung cancer (ALK-positive), metastatic: Oral: 450 mg once daily (with food); continue until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

Missed doses: If a dose is missed, take the missed dose unless the next dose is due within 12 hours. If vomiting occurs, do not administer an additional dose, patients should continue with the next scheduled dose.

Drug contraindications

 Known hypersensitivity to ceritinib or any component of the formulation; congenital long QT syndrome or persistent Fridericia-corrected electrocardiogram interval (QTcF) of >500 msec.

Side effects

  • Blurred vision
  • burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles", or tingling feelings
  • clay-colored stools
  • dark urine
  • decreased appetite
  • dry mouth
  • fever
  • flushed, dry skin
  • fruit-like breath odor
  • headache
  • increased hunger
  • increased thirst
  • increased urination
  • itching, skin rash
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea
  • stomach pain or tenderness
  • sweating
  • swelling of the feet or lower legs
  • troubled breathing
  • unexplained weight loss
  • unsteadiness or awkwardness
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting
  • weakness in the arms, hands, legs, or feet
  • yellow eyes or skin

 

Abemaciclib: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of Abemaciclib. Management: In patients taking abemaciclib at a dose of 200 mg or 150 mg twice daily, reduce the dose to 100 mg twice daily when combined with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. In patients taking abemaciclib 100 mg twice daily, decrease the dose to 50 mg twice daily. Consider therapy modification
Acalabrutinib: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of Acalabrutinib. Avoid combination
Ado-Trastuzumab Emtansine: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase serum concentrations of the active metabolite(s) of Ado-Trastuzumab Emtansine. Specifically, strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase concentrations of the cytotoxic DM1 component. Avoid combination
Ajmaline: May enhance the bradycardic effect of Ceritinib. Ajmaline may enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Ceritinib. Management: Consider alternatives to this combination. Patients with other risk factors (eg, older age, female sex, bradycardia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, heart disease, and higher drug concentrations) are likely at greater risk for these toxicities. Consider therapy modification
Alfuzosin: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of Alfuzosin. Avoid combination
Alitretinoin (Systemic): CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of Alitretinoin (Systemic). Management: Consider reducing the alitretinoin dose to 10 mg when used together with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. Monitor for increased alitretinoin effects/toxicities if combined with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. Consider therapy modification
Almotriptan: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of Almotriptan. Management: Limit initial almotriptan dose to 6.25 mg and maximum dose to 12.5 mg in any 24-period when used with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. Avoid concurrent use in patients with impaired hepatic or renal function. Consider therapy modification
Alosetron: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of Alosetron. Monitor therapy
ALPRAZolam: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of ALPRAZolam. Management: Consider using an alternative agent that is less likely to interact. If combined, monitor for increased therapeutic/toxic effects of alprazolam if combined with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. Consider therapy modification
Amiodarone: May enhance the bradycardic effect of Ceritinib. Amiodarone may enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Ceritinib. Management: Consider alternatives to this combination. Patients with other risk factors (eg, older age, female sex, bradycardia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, heart disease, and higher drug concentrations) are likely at greater risk for these toxicities. Consider therapy modification
Amisulpride (Oral): May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of QT-prolonging Agents (Moderate Risk). Monitor therapy
AmLODIPine: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of AmLODIPine. Monitor therapy
Antidiabetic Agents: Hyperglycemia-Associated Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of Antidiabetic Agents. Monitor therapy
Apixaban: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of Apixaban. Monitor therapy
Aprepitant: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of Aprepitant. Avoid combination
ARIPiprazole: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase the serum concentration of ARIPiprazole. Management: Aripiprazole dose reductions are required for indications other than major depressive disorder. Dose reductions vary based on formulation, CYP2D6 genotype, and use of CYP2D6 inhibitors. See full interaction monograph for details. Consider therapy modification
ARIPiprazole Lauroxil: CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong) may increase serum concentrations of the active metabolite(s) of ARIPiprazole Lauroxil. Management: Decrease aripiprazole lauroxil dose to next lower strength if used with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors for over 14 days. No dose adjustment needed if using the lowest dose (441 mg). Max dose is 441 mg in CYP2D6 PMs or if also taking strong CYP2D6 inhibitors. Consider therapy modification
Astemizole: QT-prolonging Strong CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Moderate Risk) may enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Astemizole. QT-prolonging Strong CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Moderate Risk) may increase the serum concentration of Astemizole. Avoid combination

Points of recommendation

Bradycardia: Symptomatic bradycardia has been reported; heart rate <50 beats/minute has occurred. If possible, avoid concurrent use with other agents known to cause bradycardia (eg, beta blockers, nondihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, clonidine, digoxin). Monitor heart rate and blood pressure regularly. If symptomatic bradycardia (not life-threatening) occurs, withhold treatment until recovery to asymptomatic bradycardia or to a heart rate of ≥60 beats/minute, evaluate concurrent medications, and adjust ceritinib dose. Permanently discontinue for life-threatening bradycardia due to ceritinib; if life-threatening bradycardia occurs and concurrent medications associated with bradycardia can be discontinued or dose adjusted, restart ceritinib at a reduced dose (with frequent monitoring).

  • Gastrointestinal toxicity: Severe and/or persistent gastrointestinal toxicity has occurred with ceritinib (at a dose of 750 mg in a fasted state). Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain occurred in the majority of patients in clinical trials using ceritinib 750 mg daily fasted (including some grade 3 and 4 events); over one-third of patients required treatment interruptions or dose reductions due to severe or persistent gastrointestinal toxicity. The incidence and severity of gastrointestinal toxicity were reduced in a clinical study utilizing ceritinib 450 mg daily with food (Cho 2017); most events were grade 1. Manage symptoms medically with appropriate therapy (eg, antidiarrheals, antiemetics, fluid replacement) as indicated. May require therapy interruption and/or dosage reduction. Ceritinib is associated with a moderate emetic potential (Hesketh 2017; Roila 2016); antiemetics may be needed to prevent nausea and vomiting. If vomiting occurs, do not administer an additional dose; continue with the next scheduled dose.
  • Hepatotoxicity: Hepatotoxicity has been observed in patients treated with ceritinib in clinical trials, including ALT levels >5 times ULN in over one-quarter of patients and AST elevations in nearly one-fifth of patients. Concurrent ALT elevations >3 times ULN with total bilirubin >2 times ULN (with normal alkaline phosphatase) occurred rarely. Monitor liver function tests (eg, ALT, AST, total bilirubin) monthly and as clinically necessary, more frequently in patients who develop transaminase abnormalities. May require therapy interruption, dosage reduction, and/or permanent discontinuation.
  • Hyperglycemia: Hyperglycemia, including grade 3 and 4 toxicity, has been observed in ceritinib-treated patients. Monitor fasting blood glucose levels at baseline and as clinically necessary. May require initiation or optimization of antihyperglycemic therapy. Temporarily interrupt therapy for hyperglycemia until adequately controlled; reduce dose upon recovery. If adequate glycemic control is not possible with medical management, permanently discontinue ceritinib.
  • Pancreatitis: Although rare, pancreatitis (with fatality) has been reported. Grade 3 to 4 lipase and amylase elevations occurred in clinical trials. Monitor lipase and amylase prior to treatment and periodically during treatment as clinically necessary. May require treatment interruption and dose reduction.
  • Pulmonary toxicity: Severe and life-threatening interstitial lung disease (ILD)/pneumonitis have been reported, including grade 3 or 4 events and fatalities. Monitor for signs/symptoms of pulmonary toxicity; permanently discontinue in patients diagnosed with treatment-related ILD/pneumonitis.
  • QTc prolongation: QTc interval prolongation has occurred in clinical studies, and may be concentration-dependent. Based on post-baseline ECG assessment, a QTc interval increase of >60 msec over baseline was observed in a small percentage of patients; some patients experienced a QTc >500 msec (when taking ceritinib 750 mg daily fasted). QT prolongation may lead to an increased risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias (eg, torsades de pointes) or sudden death. Avoid use in patients with congenital long QTc syndrome. Correct electrolyte abnormalities prior to initiating therapy. Periodically monitor ECG and electrolytes in patients with heart failure, bradyarrhythmias, electrolyte abnormalities, or who are taking medications known to prolong the QTc interval. QT prolongation may require treatment interruption, dosage reduction, or discontinuation. Permanently discontinue in patients who develop QTc interval prolongation in combination with torsades de pointes or polymorphic ventricular tachycardia or signs/symptoms of serious arrhythmia. 

Pregnancy level

Based on findings in animal reproduction studies and its mechanism of action, ceritinib may cause fetal harm if administered to a pregnant woman.


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