Drug information of Atenolol

Atenolol


Atenolol (Tenormin) is in a group of drugs called beta-blockers. Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins). Atenolol is used to treat angina (chest pain) and hypertension (high blood pressure). It is also used to treat or prevent heart attack. Atenolol may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

Mechanism of effect

Atenolol is a beta1-selective (cardioselective) beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agent without membrane stabilizing or intrinsic sympathomimetic (partial agonist) activities. This preferential effect is not absolute, however, and at higher doses, atenolol inhibits beta2-adrenoreceptors, chiefly located in the bronchial and vascular musculature

Pharmacodynamic

In standard animal or human pharmacological tests, beta-adrenoreceptor blocking activity of atenolol has been demonstrated by: (1) reduction in resting and exercise heart rate and cardiac output, (2) reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure at rest and on exercise, (3) inhibition of isoproterenol induced tachycardia, and (4) reduction in reflex orthostatic tachycardia.

Pharmacokinetics

In man, absorption of an oral dose is rapid and consistent but incomplete. Approximately 50% of an oral dose is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, the remainder being excreted unchanged in the feces. Peak blood levels are reached between two (2) and four (4) hours after ingestion The elimination half-life of oral atenolol is approximately 6 to 7 hours

Dosage

Initial dose: 50 mg orally once a day. The full effect of this dose will usually be seen within 1 to 2 weeks. If an optimal response is not achieved, the dosage should be increased to 100 mg orally once a day.

Alerts

In Patients Without a History of Cardiac Failure Concomitant Use of Calcium Channel Blockers:Bradycardia and heart block can occur and the left ventricular end diastolic pressure can rise when beta-blockers are administered with verapamil or diltiazem Bronchospastic Diseases:PATIENTS WITH BRONCHOSPASTIC DISEASE SHOULD, IN GENERAL, NOT RECEIVE BETA-BLOCKER

Points of recommendation

Do not stop taking atenolol without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. If you need to have any type of surgery, you may need to temporarily stop using atenolol. Be sure the surgeon knows ahead of time that you are using atenolol. Atenolol can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert

Pregnancy level

D


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