Drug information of Diatrizoate (Amidotrizoic acid)

Diatrizoate (Amidotrizoic acid)

Drug group:

A commonly used x-ray contrast medium.

Mechanism of effect

Radiopaque agents are drugs used to help diagnose certain medical problems. They contain iodine, which blocks x-rays. Depending on how the radiopaque agent is given, it localizes or builds up in certain areas of the body. The resulting high level of iodine allows the x-rays to make a "picture" of the area. The areas of the body in which the radiopaque agent localizes will appear white on the x-ray film. This creates the needed distinction, or contrast, between one organ and other tissues. The contrast will help the doctor see any special conditions that may exist in that organ or part of the body.

Pharmacodynamic

Depending on how the radiopaque agent is given, it localizes or builds up in certain areas of the body.

Pharmacokinetics

Route of elimination: However, it is not metabolized but excreted unchanged in the urine, each diatrizoate molecule remaining "obligated" to its sodium moiety. The liver and small intestine provide the major alternate route of excretion for diatrizoate. Injectable radiopaque diagnostic agents are excreted unchanged in human milk. Saliva is a minor secretory pathway for injectable radiopaque diagnostic agents.

Drug indications

Diagnostic imaging

Dosage

Retrograde Cystourethrography

Instill 25-300 mL into bladder depending on age of patient and degree of bladder irritability; amounts >300 mL may be used if bladder capacity allows; best results obtained when the bladder is filled with the contrast agent

Drug contraindications

Hypersensitivity

Alerts

Personal or family history of bronchial asthma, significant allergies, or previous reactions to contrast agents

Iodine sensitivity

Use caution in hepatic impairment, heart failure, hypertension, multiple myeloma, hyperthyroidism, pheochromocytoma, renal impairment, sickle cell disease, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and thromboembolism

Points of recommendation

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take diatrizoate meglumine. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Thyroid problems have happened after use of diatrizoate meglumine. Some people had to be treated for these thyroid problems. Talk with the doctor.
  • This medicine may affect certain lab tests. Tell all of your health care providers and lab workers that you take diatrizoate meglumine.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using diatrizoate meglumine while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

Pregnancy level

Group c - Not adequate studies in pregnant women


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